Two Top End military aircraft experienced in-flight issues within 24 hours

TWO military aircraft experienced mid-flight malfunctions over Top End skies within 24 hours of each other.

A Royal Australian Air Force spokeswoman said a C130 aircraft a USAF F-16 fighter jet were involved in separate incidents on Monday and Tuesday.

She said a C130 aircraft was returning to Darwin at 5.35pm on Monday when an engine “malfunctioned”, but the aircraft was able to land safely without incident.

The next day the USAF F-16 aircraft experienced an in-flight emergency and was forced to return to the base early ending its flight.

“The aircraft dumped fuel in accordance with normal procedures. The aircraft landed safely using the cable at approximately 9.10pm

Exercise Diamond Storm began in late April and runs until May 29 with aircraft operating out of RAAF Bases Tindal and Darwin. According to the RAAF, the exercise is the final phase of the Air Warfare Instructor Course, a three phase intensive six-month course that integrates war fighting functions across a range of specialisations.

Marines are bringing more air power than ever to annual training in Australia

Aircraft deploying to Australia’s Northern Territory include 10 MV-22 Osprey tiltrotors, four AH-1Z Vipers and three UH-1Y Venom helicopters, a Marine spokesman said.

Aircraft deploying for the rotation include 10 MV-22 Osprey tiltrotors, four AH-1Z Vipers and three UH-1Y Venom helicopters, Marine spokesman 1st Lt. Colin Kennard said in an email.

The aircraft represent “the most capable Aviation Combat Element” sent to Darwin since the rotational deployments began in 2011, he said.

“These aircraft increase the training value for MRF-D activities and increase our ability to respond to contingencies within the Indo-Pacific region,” he said.

To facilitate operations for the U.S.A. helicopters, temporary airfield matting has been installed at RAAF base Darwin.

U.S. chopper makes emergency landing on Ikeijima Island, Okinawa

A U.S. military helicopter carrying four people made an emergency landing Saturday afternoon on a small islet in Okinawa Prefecture.

The chopper apparently landed about 100 meters from a house, a local resident said.

The aviation incident is the latest involving U.S. aircraft in the prefecture, where opposition to the huge U.S. military presence is rife.

The island is the same one where an AH-1 attack helicopter based at U.S. Marine Corps Air Station Futenma made an emergency landing on a farm path on Jan. 20 last year.

“I’m speechless. The frequency is too often. It cannot be helped but to think there’s a systemic problem within the U.S. military,” Okinawa Deputy Gov. Moritake Tomikawa told reporters.

“I felt it was dangerous because the helicopter was lowering altitude and heading toward the coast with a rattling noise,” he said. “The U.S. military always prioritizes military operations and neglects the anxieties of local residents,” said Tamaki, who heads the local residents’ association.

USAF B-1B Lancers to train with RAAF in Qld

RAAF Base Amberley will host up to two United States Air Force (USAF) B-1B Lancers as part of the United States-Australia Force Posture Initiatives.

The USAF B-1B Lancers are long-range, multi-mission, supersonic conventional bomber aircraft and will be taking part in a training exercise with the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) during the last week in November and the first week of December this year.

Minister for Defence Senator the Hon Marise Payne said the training will enable RAAF aircrew to meet flying qualifications and give them an opportunity to exercise with one of the world’s most technologically advanced armed forces.

“This training exercise is part of the United States-Australia Force Posture Initiatives Enhanced Air Cooperation (EAC) program, which builds on a range of air exercises and training activities already undertaken between the United States and Australia,” Minister Payne said.

“The EAC program is a practical demonstration of Australia’s support for a strong and engaged US presence in the region.”

EAC activities involve short term rotations of US aircraft through Australia for up to two months at a time. The first EAC activity commenced in February 2017 at RAAF Base Tindal with 12 USAF F-22 Raptors conducting combined training with RAAF F/A-18 Hornets.

This activity will be the fifth and final EAC activity in 2017. The exercise will involve USAF B-1Bs and RAAF aircraft conducting flying training in designated airspace away from RAAF Base Amberley.

$30 million RAAF Darwin boost

A $30-MILLION upgrade of aircraft facilities in Darwin forms part of the first projects outlined by the US Force Posture Initiative.

The forward work projects involve improving the aircraft maintenance facility and expanding the aircraft parking apron at RAAF Darwin.

More than 200 Territory business were guided through the procurement system of the United States Navy by a team from the Hawaii-based Naval Facilities Engineering Command. NAVFAC is the US Department of Defence organisation responsible for the delivery and management of US-funded military construction projects in Australia. Around $1 billion is expected to be spent as part of the joint Force Posture Initiative, which involves the basing of a 2500 rotational US marine force and a significant air support.

Department of Business chief executive Michael Tennant opened the day telling the group the day was about learning how to engage with the US Department of Defence.

“Today won’t be focused on specific projects, these details will be made available in future briefings,” he said.

“Today is all about working with the US procurement system and follows the event held in late 2016."

To benefit from these opportunities, industry must be prepared to invest the time necessary to learn how to engage in the US procurement system, to gain the necessary accreditations, meet the required Australian and US standards, and follow the processes and procedures required by US Defence or their prime contractors.

“It also requires thinking about how NT businesses might partner with other businesses to grow capability and capacity.”

 

An Australian Defence economic impact assessment released in 2013 estimated that the rotational deployment of just 1100 Marines would increase Gross State Product by $5.6 million in 2014.